Seniors who voted for the first time weigh in

and

For many Manual seniors, today was their first opportunity to vote. It was even more important because it was a presidential election, but many expressed concern about the outcome.

Michael Ioffe (12, MST) predicted a gridlock for the next four years.

“What I’m worried most about is that, no matter who becomes president, it will be very hard for the candidate to implement their ideas and their policies with the majority of Congress,” Ioffe said.

However, for this election, the decision is not as clear as it has appeared in the past.

“People really have to balance who they vote for,” Kevin Wang (12, MST) said, “I mean, they’re both bad candidates for the presidency, but you have to choose the lesser evil.”

Even more is in play in a social and historical setting, as Hillary Clinton could very well be the first female president of the United States.

“Not only does it show young girls that they can do whatever they put their minds to, but it also sets an example for young boys— showing them that, despite history, they are not the only ones that can take priority,” said Ioffe.

Will Cissell (12, HSU) believes that Clinton could help change the gender boundary in American politics.

“Having the first female president would be huge for women in this country and this would be the strongest push for gender equality,” said Cissell.

Wang, however, disagrees, saying that sex shouldn’t influence politics as much.

“I just want to say race and sex shouldn’t really play a role in politics in general. Everything should be compared to an individual’s policies and their attitude toward politics,” said Wang

The two candidates have gone back and forth for months, sparking controversies that lead to unruly discoveries—the DNC’s bias for Hillary and her private email server, Trump’s Draft dodging and unpaid taxes—that have influenced voters not to vote in this election.

Using the opinions they have shared above, Ioffe and Wang have made up their minds for this year’s election.

“I wouldn’t say [my vote has] changed, but it’s definitely gotten closer after the debates, the release of the emails, and the Trump tapes. It’s definitely gotten a lot closer,” said Ioffe.

“Hillary Clinton shouldn’t become president. I mean, I don’t agree with Trump, but I disagree with her even more. Some of her policies are really democratic and will hurt the conservative population of our nation,” said Wang.

Cissell contends that the choice is not as easy to make.

“Basically, if you are voting for Hillary, you are continuing everything that Obama has started and if you to Trump you unwind almost everything that has happened in the past 8 years,” Cissell said.

Other seniors also reflected on their first times at the polls.

Skye Spalding (12, J&C) said that her experience with voting went more smoothly than her expectations.

“I was honestly expecting it to be more stressful than it was, but that being said, it’s important to go in to your polling place prepared with who you want to vote for in every category,” Spalding said, “If you go in not knowing about local politicians, as well as national, or even state, it can probably seem really confusing.”

Caroline Glazier (12, YPAS) felt that her first time voting was important and that she was doing her part in the election.

“I have been wanting to vote for so long and I saw so many other people voting today. It just felt good to know we are all voicing our opinions and that they matter,” Glazier said.

SHARE
Cicada Hoyt is a staffer of RedEye this year. She loves photography, good movies, hiking, slushies, all types of music and her friends. She plans to study Advertising and Public Relations and her dream job is to be a photojournalist for National Geographic. You can contact her at [email protected] or @bugthebabe on instagram.